Monthly Archives: February 2014

-AeroComposit chooses innovative solutions to build MS-21 composite wings

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MS-21´s wing spars, wing skins and six section panels will be manufactured by resin infusion and oven curing

Resin infusion is being applied in the newest commercial aviation programmes. One of them is the Irkut´s Corporation´s (Russia) MS-21 aircraft, which could be rolled out in 2015 (prototype). The post offers some details about the MS-21 aircraft, as well as about the innovative resin infusion technology they are applying in order to push the Russian companies at the the forefront of the worldwide aircraft industry.

Although Irkut will only produce 40 aircrafts/year (compared to approximately 500 each for Airbus and Boeing), the new MS-21 could compete with worldwide market leaders in the single-aisle commercial jet market.

Irkut MS-21 aircraft

Irkut´s MS-21 aircraft

To succeed in this highly competitive market, Irkut´s aircraft will have to offer a good performance and a greater fuel efficiency than its competitors. MS-21 will have a lower empty weight, a better aerodynamics and more efficient engines. The company is confident that if the MS-21 can use composites in a way that reduces weight and manufacturing costs in that 45 percent with a a target price of 35 Million US$.

To this end, in terms of technology, the company has decided to go one step ahead ,since the very beginning of the programme definition, being at the cutting edge of the aircraft industry, using Out of Autoclave methods for structural parts manufacturing.

Infusion and oven curing have been chosen for the MS-21’s large integrally stiffened primary structures including the wing spars, wing skins and six section panels

Infusion and oven curing have been chosen for the MS-21’s large integrally stiffened primary structures including the wing spars, wing skins and six section panels for the centre wing-box. These will be manufactured and assembled at the AeroComposit (also subsidiary of UAC) plant in Ulyanovsk. These process have been chosen due to its potential to reduce costs (avoiding the costly autoclave curing and reducing resin and dry material costs), and its opportunity to create integral constructions.

MS-21 resin infused wing

MS-21 resin infused wing (Diamond Aircraft´s photo)

AeroComposit has worked with a variety of experts worldwide to develop the design, materials and the process to achieve the requisite precision and quality. In terms of raw material, Hexcel and Cytec have been selected to provide dry carbon fiber and compatible liquid epoxy infusion resin. Hexcel´s OoA HiTape (up to 30mm thick) and it´s HexFlow infusion resin have been already tested to be used for the wing manufacturing.  The company affirms that 58 to 60% fiber volume content can be achieved with these  materials. An equivalent system from Cytec is also being used in the project.

The wing is based on the new carbon-infusion technology that allows building big components, like tail units or wings, with high stability at low weight.

Regarding the infusion process, FACC and Diamond Aircraft will be responsible for optimizing the wing and wing-box manufacturing process. Diamond Aircraft has developed the resin infusion process for the wing manufacturing. The wing is based on the new carbon-infusion technology that allows building big components, like tail units or wings, with high stability at low weight. The resin is cured at an aerospace standard of 180°C/356°F with a service temperature of -60°C to 160°C (-76°F to 320°F) while the production cycle can vary from 5 to 30 hours. The manufactured wing meets the requirements of the aircraft industry with a porosity of 0,3%. Diamond Aircraft claims that this achievement does not depend on the type of construction, but instead on the ability to maintain strict control of the process parameters. According to the company, the prototype wing is a a great achievement, that will have a mayor impact on the design of future airlines.

You can find more information in these CompositesWorld, Diamond Aircraft and Russia Beyond the State of the Art articles.